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Breitling Chronomat 769 1945 Vintage 36mm Manual
Breitling Chronomat Vintage 769 36mm Manual stainless steel Case White Dial Unisex

Breitling Chronomat 769 1945 Vintage 36mm Manual

Your Price: $7,999.00
Breitling Chronomat Vintage 769 36mm Manual stainless steel Case White Dial Unisex
Inventory Code: RI217
Availability: In Stock. Free Shipping.
Box / Papers None
Observed Rate performs per manufacturer specs
Bracelet Length strap
Condition Near Mint
Condition Notes - Very light signs of use on the bracelet. For a 75 year old watch, the case is very sharp and original dial and hands is in impossibly preserved cond
The Breitling Chronomat with its rotating slide-rule was patented in 1941 as war raged through Europe and other parts of the world, its design offering a welcome respite from the plethora of military and military-inspired watches of the period. The Chronomats emphasis on engineering and mathematics, science and industry seemed to offer hope for a future when the war would be over and reconstruction could begin.

The Chronomat has remained one of Breitling's most successful watches for over sixty years. Contrary to general belief, it is not the Navitimer but the Chronomat that has in recent years proved to be Breitling's most popular model and biggest seller.

It is generally accepted that the Chronomat made its public sales debut in 1942 and this is the date that has been quoted for many years by the Breitling company. The circular slide-rule design of the Chronomat has come to be known as the 'Type 42' to differentiate it from the 'Type 52' slide-rule first seen on the Navitimer supposedly in 1952 (NB: some Breitling experts believe the actual launch of the Navitimer was later than 1952).

The 1940's Chronomat is regarded by many collectors as one of the most attractive Breitlings ever made, a true classic.

There is a red 0 - 100 scale near the middle of the dial which can be used for reading 1/100ths of a minute which facilitates computations using the slide-rule. The Swiss cross and the number 217012 on the dial refer to the Swiss government patent that was granted in 1940.

In common with other Breitling chronographs at this time, the minute register is marked at 3, 6 and 9 minutes as long-distance phone calls were charged in 3-minute increments in most countries. Long distance and especially international 'toll' calls were very expensive at this time; connection was via the operator; there was no direct dialling, and it was important not to go 'over' one's chosen duration and become liable for a charge of a further three minutes. The turning bezel includes an outer telemeter scale which is used for measuring the distance of a phenomenon that is both visible and audible, eg lightning/thunder.

The Chronomat was conceived and then promoted as a watch for scientitists, engineers, mathematicians; for timing and financial calculations. It was specifically not designed for military men or pilots. By the end of the war the watch was advertised with a particular emphasis that would appeal to hard-working men of achievement in the new age that beckoned after the dark days of the earlier 1940s.

Material: Stainless steel
Dimensions: 36mm diameter
Caliber: Manual-wound chronograph caliber Venus 175
Lug Width: 18mm

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