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Tudor Date + Day 7019/4 1980 Vintage Jumbo 38mm Auto
Tudor Date + Day 7019/4 38mm Auto

Tudor Date + Day 7019/4 1980 Vintage Jumbo 38mm Auto

Your Price: $3,499.00
Tudor Date + Day 7019/4 38mm Auto
Inventory Code: SB405
Availability: In Stock. Free Shipping.
Box / Papers None
Observed Rate keeps good time at -37s/d
Bracelet Length up to 7.5 inches
Condition Excellent
Condition Notes - Light signs of use on the case and bracelet. Case very sharp with beveled lugs. Dial is incredibly well preserved and has developed an attractive pa
In 1956, Rolex made the perfect dress watch.

With the same proportions as its perennial favorite, the Datejust, the Day-Date differed from its cousin in that it displayed the day—as well as the date—on the dial and was only available in precious metals. But what the Day-Date lacked in versatility, it made up for in refinement. In many ways it was the Crown’s crown jewel, and has been a benchmark of success for certain well-dressed gentlemen for decades, a mark of its regal—or even presidential—quality.

And yet for many the Day-Date is a little too… well, too. Too well-known, too flashy (although examples in white gold or platinum do have a more subdued quality), too Rolex. A watch as dignified as the Day-Date just doesn’t go well with khakis and a polo.

Thank God there’s Tudor.

Tudor has been, since its inception in the 1940s, the perfect analogue to Rolex. Where Rolex has been aspirational, Tudor is affordable, offering the same quality of Rolex but with less expensive movements. For every Rolex watch, there was a Tudor equivalent: a dive watch (also named Submariner), an everyday watch with a date, a chronograph.

But while the Rolex watches were static, more or less, in terms of appearance, Tudor is where Rolex really showed us the meaning of variance.

Take the Tudor Oyster Prince Day-Date, for example. While the Rolex Day-Date was offered in precious metals, the Tudor Day-Date was always in steel or with touches of gold. Where the Rolex Day-Date has remained (until quite recently, to some chagrin) 36mm, Tudor experimented with case sizes, bezels, and dial colors and configurations. At 38mm it’s a full two millimeters larger than its Rolex counterpart.

Though the case proportions are on the larger size for the era, it’s not as bulky as its Rolex-branded counterparts, the case material and the ETA movement ensuring that the watch wears considerably thinner.

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